Suppose you are a disabled rider and cannot get on the road because of your disability. The great news is that you can use an adaptive system to modify the bike to fit your disability needs to your heart’s content. As technology has advanced tremendously in this area, the disabled are now given the opportunity to feel the wind on their faces once more with a customizable wheelchair motorcycle.

Wheelchair Motorcycle Lets Disabled Riders Get Back on the Road

This state-of-the-art adaptive system has unique features designed to fit every disabled rider’s needs and wants. It also gives proper control of the wheelchair motorcycle for the rider’s safety.

Since old-school motorcycles don’t allow riders with missing limbs to enjoy rides, some newer models have gone the extra mile to do whatever it takes for this group to get back on the road. Here are some of the cool features.

1. Custom Clutch Systems

If the rider’s left hand and fingers are disabled, it is essential to remove clutches. Some transmission conversions are automatically set to operate clutches automatically, while other motorcycles like US’s Ridley have automatic transmission.

People with arthritis or low muscle strength can adapt to the comfortable and ergonomic clutch system. Custom clutch systems are the best option if you have to control rear brakes and the clutch at the same time.

2. Custom Dual Brake System

Registered wheelchair motorcycles need to have a dual brake system. This type of system has precise controls to start different brakes. For instance, a rider can use the right hand to control lever brakes in the front wheel and their right foot to work on the lever exerting brakes on the wheelchair motorcycle’s rear wheel.

There is a conversion kit in the dual brake system besides a handbrake lever that moves the control foot brake to the hand brake lever. The conversion kit assumes the rider can use their right-hand fingers fully.

3. Reverse Gear

Many motorcycle models lack reverse gears, and riders have to use their feet to move the bike in reverse. The reverse gear tweak on wheelchair motorcycles is essential for some disabled riders. The easiest way to customize it is by converting a gearbox to have a reverse or including a remote-control caravan mover.

Bolt the caravan mover to the chassis of a wheelchair in a place that allows wheels to move while rolling against the rubber tire. The caravan mover can reverse your motorcycle in a sloppy area with the touch of a button.

4. Prosthetic Aids

A prosthetic hand can be attached to the motorcycle’s handlebar; this attachment is essential to an amputee and acts as a rider’s limb extension. Prosthetic aids can control the handlebar attachment with a quick-release mechanism.

5. Retractable Wheels and Stabilizer Bars

Retractable wheels help the motorcycle stop without faults, while stabilizer bars retract when you start moving. On this modification, there is a footplate designed to fit an individual’s specific disability needs, used to protect the rider’s knee from the fuel tank. There is no need for a rider to place down their foot to stop the bike with this simple tweak.

6. Electric Push Button Kit Shifters

Electric push button kit shifters are electromagnetically activated on electric switches and attached to the wheelchair motorcycle’s handlebar. The electromagnetic solenoid represents the rider’s foot and moves the motorcycle’s gear selector up and down.

Final Thoughts

Whatever wheelchair motorcycle model you own, different tweaks can fit your unique disability needs. You do not have to change your wheelchair to get back on the road.

There are motorcycle trikes with high speed and enough space to accommodate you and your wheelchair. You could also remote control it to lower and raise the ramp, and its parking brakes with six forward gears are fully electronic.

But before going on that ‘dream ride’ once more, talk with a law professional at Jacoby &Meyers Law Offices about the many different ways to get back on the road as a disabled person while meeting your home state’s traffic laws and regulations.